Click here for Live weather image

The Languedoc-Roussillon has an exceptionally good climate and claims over 300 days of sunshine a year. The majority of the region enjoys a Mediterranean climate, with temperatures in some parts soaring over 30° C (80° F) in the summer months – particularly near the coast.

For those who can’t take the heat, the more mountainous, inland areas of the Lozère and the Pyrenees foothills naturally offer slightly cooler temperatures in the height of summer (July and August) and, of course, the option of snowy winters on the ski slopes. Indeed, all parts of the Languedoc-Roussillon certainly have four distinct seasons.

Our local weather station  

Bearing in mind that the Languedoc-Roussillon covers a huge area (27,376 square km or 10,569.9 square miles to be precise) and that the different parts of the region have some variations with micro-climates in the valleys and hills, the following is a general guide to what to expect in each season:

March, April, May

On the whole, this is a good time to enjoy the region, as the weather is likely to be comfortably warm and sunny most days, making it ideal for walking, canoeing, pony trekking, cycling or sailing. After the darker winter months, everything is coming back to life and the squares of villages and towns become filled again with outdoor café chairs. You will be able to enjoy a day at the beach on one of the warmer days although the water may not be quite up to a dip!

By April the temperatures are frequently around 20 – 22° C at midday and it’s likely to be sunny most days with clear blue skies. The heat starts to build in May and temperatures can reach 24° – 26° C in the afternoon or more and up to the 30s as we move into June. However, this is a changeable season, with the odd rainy shower in early spring. By late spring it can be warm enough to dispense with coats one day, yet chilly and windy the next with grey skies.

This is my favourite time in many ways, as the region is the most incredible vibrant green and poppies, daisies, buttercups, almond and cherry blossoms and wild flowers return to the fields.

June, July, August

The weather in this period is hot and sunny, with temperatures rising up to 37°C and sometimes 40°C in the afternoons at their height. Warm temperatures tend to last long into the evening, but drop to become refreshingly cool at night. Although it’s extremely hot, it tends to be a dry heat and there is often a refreshingly light breeze which prevents it from becoming oppressive. Plan your outings around the cooler parts of the day and stay inside over lunch, or linger in that premier-pharmacy.com/product-category/allergy/ café for two hours. If going to the beach, it’s best to turn up  at about 4.00 in the afternoon and drink a lot of water to avoid dehydration and sunstroke.

Many events, shops and entertainment will be open or begin in the late afternoon/evening – a perfect lifestyle for the heat. However, it does sometimes rain in the summer, often at night, and when it does it can be heavy.

This is the time when you’ll see sunflowers, lavender and ripening grapes on the vines, and towards the end of the summer the landscape starts to look a little dry and dusty.

September, October, November

September is for the most part warm, mild, and sunny – lovely Indian Summer weather, though it is also prone to violent storms as the temperatures change from the heat of summer. Midday in September and even October can still be hot – around 28°C – but it is beginning to get cooler in the evenings again. The weather can be unsettled, cloudy and rainy weather at times towards the end of October and through November, with temperatures dropping to low 20s in the afternoon. However, the vibrant autumn colours make this a fabulous time to visit the region.

December, January, February

The winter in the Languedoc-Roussillon tends to be much shorter and milder than other Northern European countries, and, of course, sunnier. It tends to last just two months before it begins to warm up again. Unlike summer and spring, the winter can be cloudy and unsettled, but is also frequently sunny over much of December and January. Minimum temperatures are around 1–3°C in winter, with frosts from time to time. The Cévennes and Pyrenees mountainous areas do get snow mid to late winter and on into March – and are therefore popular destinations for weekend skiing.

Snow on the sunlit mountains and a log fire indoors are wonderful, whilst there is a certain romantic quality to the deserted coastal resorts. When the winds blow in the Languedoc-Roussillon in winter, they can make the region feel very cold. The Tramontane is a cold wind which blows from the northwest between the Pyrenees and the South Massif Central, accelerating its way towards Hérault. It is less violent than Provence’s Mistral and blows for a few days and then is gone. It can be felt in Montpellier and most of the Hérault.

Temperatures can rise up to the 20s again by lunchtime on a good day in winter. It has been possible for people, in a good year, to be able to eat their Christmas lunch outside. Once February arrives, the temperatures usually start to rise and spring flowers appear.

Climate statistics

Typical climate statistics for Château Ventenac area

Month
Ave. Temp (Day)
Precipitation (mm)
Sunshine
Month
Ave. Temp(Day)
Precipitation (mm)
Sunshine
January
15
50.6
66%
July
31
17.1
92%
February
16
44.8
67%
August
31
32.0
87%
March
19
43.5
78%
September
27
47.3
75%
April
20
55.9
74%
October
23
89.8
71%
May
24
50.1
76%
November
18
58.6
69%
June
27
28.3
80%
December
15
54.4
63%